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Should Ministers Preach Christ in Every Sermon?

Should a minister preach Christ and the Gospel in every sermon? Or the question may be asked, "Does God expect a minister to preach Christ from every text of scripture? The first question can be answered quite easily: If we want people to be saved we should! The second needs to be more carefully addressed. I have recently heard several ministers express that it is sufficie...

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The Puritan Exegesis Project: William Fenner on Lam. 3:57

Walter Brueggemann once said, “When we pray we participate in the ultimate act of humanness as we yield to a power greater than ourselves.” There is a faint echo of Brueggemann’s statement in William Fenner’s (1600 – 1640) treatise on prayer: The Sacrifice of the Faithful … shewing the nature property, and efficacy of Zealous Prayer: ...

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Richard Gaffin Perspectives on Pentecost Interview

We recently had the great privilege of interviewing Dr. Richard Gaffin with regard to his teaching on the theology of Luke Acts. The content of the interview was essentially a digestion of what is taught in Perspectives on Pentecost. I read this work many years ago, and, sadly, did not benefit from it then as I have now that I am presently preaching through the book of Ac...

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The Restoration

Here is the most recent sermon preached at New Covenant Presbyterian Church. The text was Acts 3:1-26 and the title, "The Restoration."...

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How to Degospelise the Gospel

Charles Spurgeon in his sermon "Apostolic Exhortation," explained the necessity of preaching Christ. Note especially what he says about the time when Peter preached Christ: It is noteworthy that Peter, in addressing this crowd, came at once to the very essence and bowels of his message. He did not beat the bush; he did not shoot his arrow far afield, but he hit the very ce...

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The Puritan Exegesis Project: Thomas Manton on Daniel 7:13, ‘The Son of Man’

Rudolph Bultmann famously asked, “Is exegesis without presuppositions possible?” Many Biblical scholars since have made clean distinctions between exegesis and eisegesis, sometimes for good reason. Aichele and Phillips (Semenia vols. 69-70) contrast Bultmann’s statement with the discipline of intertextuality: they maintain that the distinction between ex...

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Understanding the Law and its Uses

There continues to be confusion about the precise relationship between the Law and the Gospel, the Law and the Covenant people, and the Law and the Mosaic Covenant. This is the case because there is confusion over the different uses of the Law, as taught in Scripture. There have been a plethora of views, even within the writings of Reformed theologians from the Reformation...

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The Progressive Aloneness of Jesus

There is a striking progression in the life and ministry of our Lord Jesus, in which He is shown to be the One who alone can bear the wrath of God on behalf of His people. At the beginning of the Gospels He has multitudes surrounding Him. Then He narrows it down to the seventy. From that group He chooses twelve. Then He takes eleven into the Garden and pulls three aside wi...

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The Value of a Sheep, a Coin and a Son

There is an interesting development in the account of the lost and found parables of Luke 15. There are 1 out of 100 sheep, 1 out of 10 coins, and 1 out of two sons. Sinclair Ferguson notes: Luke 15 contains three parables. In some ways, they are three parts of one larger parable--a single message about lost things being found, each episode told in a context of increased ...

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Vos on the Covenant of Works and Sinai

In the midst of current debates over the precise relationship between the pre-lapsarian Covenant of Works and the Mosaic Covenant, it would do us good to remember that many of the Reformed theologians of the 17th, 18th, and 19th Centuries understood that the Law given at Sinai, with its promise of blessing and cursing in accord with its subsequent demand for perfect obedie...

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